Fake DVLA Car Text Scam – How to Avoid

Fake DVLA Car Text Scam – How to Avoid

The DVLA have issued a warning about a prevalent vehicle tax (VED) scam today, as it advises motorists are being urged to be wary of text message and/or emails from people claiming to be the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA).

In response to these scams, the DVLA has clarified its position with regards to contacting motorists, the Daily Express first reported.

It said: “We don’t send emails or text messages that ask you to confirm your personal details or payment information, such as for a vehicle tax refund.

“If you get anything like this, don’t open any links and delete the email or text immediately.”

Scam artists are posing as the famous motoring agency to try to glean sensitive information such as your bank details from UK motorists.

The RAC warns that, despite (2017) changes to car tax causing an element of confusion, it’s important that motorists remain vigilant to cons like this.

Cost of motoring “huge”

Spokesperson for the RAC, Pete Williams told us: “The cost of motoring is a huge concern for motorists, so the offer of an unexpected tax rebate can sound very tempting.

“Always be wary of any request asking for personal information and be alert to any offer that sounds too good to be true.”

Free Car Check do not offer “text checks” as part of our service. Please disregard any such text messages that claim to be from us, all of our services are strictly through our website.

A new text message has surfaced over the past week which is claiming motorists have an outstanding tax payment they need to settle. The message reads: “DVLA: We have identified that you have an outstanding vehicle ta fund from an overpayment. Please visit https://dvla.refund-form-ref81.com to process.”

IGNORE this email/text message, it’s fraudulent

The FreeCarCheck top tips to protect yourself and others from DVLA scams

  • Only use GOV.UK so you can be sure that you’re dealing directly with DVLA.
  • Never share images on social media that contain personal information, such as your driving licence and vehicle documents.
  • Report online scams to Action Fraud.
  • Report misleading adverts to search engines.
  • Keep up to date with internet safety – read more about online scams and phishing, and how to stay safe online.

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